Jul 052018
 

 

Summer-time is a great time of year. The kid’s are out of school, families take vacations, and there are a lot of family gatherings, picnics, barbeques and games. There is swimming, fishing, boating, biking, hiking, gardening and so much more.

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Along with all this fun in the sun comes the responsibility (everything has a price) to ourselves and our families safe from the dangers of too much sun exposure.

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Get the EPA’s Guide to SunWise Behavior

The UV rays from the sun penetrate to the deepest layers of our skin. They can cause our skin to sag, age and spot. 95% of the rays from the sun that reach the earth are UVA radiation. Unlike UVB rays, UVA rays hit in a steady stream during each day. The critical hours for sun exposure are from 10 am to 4 pm.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. According to an article published by the New Mexico State University, “three types of skin cancers make up 99% of skin cancers.”

One in five Americans will have a form of skin cancer.

Some of the symptoms of skin cancer are:

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MelanomaSymptoms-CDC-7-5-18

What can you do?

Protect your skin with sunscreen.

Choose sunscreen that:

  1. Has an SPF of 30 or more;

  2. Is water resistant; and

  3. Provides broad spectrum coverage.

Also:

  1. Wear wide-brimmed hats;

  2. Protect your eyes with sunglasses; and

  3. Use sun unbrellas and wear long-sleeved shirts.

Have fun out there this summer, but don’t risk your health or that of your children and other loved ones to do it. Preach safe sun havits over and over again, and then practice what you preach. You will see the benefits.

Resources:

http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_i/I106/

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/symptoms.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/sunexposure/default.html

Picture credits: Beach scene : Gvictoria – Dreamstime.com; http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_i/I106/

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/symptoms.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/index.htm

Martha is owner of RobardsHealthyLifestyles.com, a health and wellness website that promotes healthy lifestyles, ideas and products for physical, mental and emotional, financial and natural/spiritual wellness. Martha’s work consists of opening accounts, presenting, speaking, mentoring and coaching and people building. You can reach Martha at 505-750-7847, by email at marthapmintl@gmail.com, on Facebook, here on LinkedIn, Twitter, or through her websites at RobardsHealthyLifestyles.com, here, here, or ProfessionalMentorsInternational.com.

 

May 112017
 

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Summer is quickly approaching.    On some days in Arizona, it feels like it’s already here.    Sunny days are ahead.

Now is the time to start thinking about sunscreen.    Wearing it all year long is a great idea, but for those who think about it more when they feel the heat, now is the time.

  • Limit Exposure

MayoClinic.org, says,

“Skin cancer — the abnormal growth of skin cells — most often develops on skin exposed to the sun.”

It goes on to say what to do to reduce the risk, by stating,

“You can reduce your risk of skin cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation.”

Sunscreen will help you reduce and avoid that exposure.

  • Choosing a Sunscreen

Choose a sunscreen that has a high SPF.    What is that?    SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. Although there seems to be controversy on this, generally the higher the better.    A sunscreen with less chemicals in it, for many, is a better choice.

SPF measures how well a sunscreen protects against UVB rays (the radiation that causes sunburn and damages skin) and UVA rays (also damages the skin, but deeper).     According to Skincancer.org/prevention/uva-and-uvb,

“UVA, which penetrates the skin more deeply than UVB, has long been known to play a major part in skin aging and wrinkling (photoaging), …”

Have fun in the sun, but be proactive and take steps to protect yourself and your whole family by buying and using a high quality sunscreen.

Martha maintains RobardsHealthyLifestyles.com , which is a health and wellness information website that promotes healthy living and products for healthy living. For more information contact Martha at marthapmintl@gmail.com or 505-750-7847.

 

 

Jun 082016
 

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BE COOL IN SUMMER

All of us (yes, I’m a big kid!) kids, big and small, look forward to summer! Outdoor sports, hiking, playing ball, running and walking in the park, swimming and going to the lake are all things we love to do in the summertime.

Being in the sun is fun, but it can also be dangerous. Our bodies can overheat and cause us to get sick. The Arizona Department of Health Services has a list of things that can help you be safe in the sun. Here are a few of them:

  • Use Sunscreen Every Day! Even on cloudy days, the sun’s rays can damage your skin. Wear sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. Apply 10 minutes before going outside and reapply every 2 ½ hours or sooner if perspiring or engaging in water activities. Wearing sunscreen every day is as important as brushing your teeth!

  • Wear a Wide-Brimmed Hat and Lip Balm! A hat with a wide brim offers better protection for your scalp, ears, face and the back of your neck than a baseball cap or visor . And, protect lips with SPF 15+ lip balm.

  • Wear Sunglasses! Sunglasses reduce sun exposure that can damage your eyes and lead to cataracts. Check the label and choose sunglasses that block at least 90% of UVA and UVB rays.

  • Cover Up! Wear long sleeves and pants if possible to protect your skin when playing or working outdoors. Darker colors and fabric with a tight weave provide the most protection.

  • Limit Time in the Midday Sun! Limit your outdoor activities when the UV rays are strongest and most damaging (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). Remember: Look for your shadow—if no shadow, seek cover!

  • Take Cover! Find something fun that doesn’t involve exposure to direct sun. Take cover under a tree, ramada or find an indoor activity inside a gym, library or classroom during peak UV.

For more information, go to: www.azdhs.gov/phs/sunwise

You can reach me (Meme) at marthapmintl@gmail.com or by going to my website www.RobardsHealthyLifestyles.com. Send me questions or comments. I’d love to hear from you. Meme’s News No. 2 (June 1016) © 2016

 Martha Robards Headshot