Dec 032018
 

 

Sunset 12-3-18

It’s the first week of December and it’s getting colder.  People are loading up on their nutritional supplies now for winter.  If you are, don’t forget to keep in mind being an educated, aware consumer.

For the cost of a cup of coffee a day, we can get high-quality nutritional supplements. We can give ourselves the best chance to get the nutrition our bodies need to live a healthy life and have healthy lifestyles.  Eating right, exercising, getting enough sleep and fresh air and water are all part of a healthy lifestyle, along with good nutritional supplements. Being aware of what is available helps us decide what we want and helps us learn how to be more aware of ourselves and what we are doing. As a result, we may start changing our thinking and habits involving how we shop for our nutritional supplies and supplements.

Do Your Research

Sometimes it’s not easy to know which supplements to purchase. They are definitely an investment.  There are a lot of good companies out there with good products, and there are also a lot of bad companies out there with bad products.

There is no doubt that it takes time and energy to do the research necessary to find good products we feel good about purchasing.  But it is worth it. When we do, chances are we will be repeat customers.  We will continue to buy that product.   Being an educated consumer means we know where our hard-earned money is going, and we can be happy with the decisions we’ve made. We do that with the homes, cars, and clothes we purchase. Shouldn’t we do it with what we are putting into our bodies as well?

Research the company that manufactures the supplements you are considering. Where is it located? What are their manufacturing and distributing practices? How old are the supplements by the time they get to your hands? These are things some choose to be concerned about. They address healthy lifestyles from deeper aspects such as where our money is going, how the companies we support contribute to green living and, again, being educated consumers.

I would love to tell you more about the nutritional products and supplements my family and I use.

Contact me at marthapmintl@gmail.com , or call me on my cell phone at 505-750-7847.

Martha xox

 

Aug 082018
 

Bumping Up Fiber

Information overload. New trends. Nutrition buzzwords. Fiber.

We need fiber. Good nutrition is a well balanced every-day diet. Fiber must be a part of that and will be, if we’re including plenty of variety of fruits, vegetables, and other helpfuls. Some eat legumes, some don’t. Living a healthy lifestyle, a nutritious lifestyle, can be easy, fun and exciting. This, of course, depends on you and me.

Add peas to your salad

Add peas to your salad

The CDC says:

In their natural state, fruits and vegetables have high water and fiber content and thus are low in calories and energy density.

So, eating enough fiber-rich fruits and vegetable can aid in efforts to lose weight.

Put cherries in smoothies

Put cherries in smoothies

Some of the other benefits of fiber in your diet are that it not only keeps you regular, it also helps you feel fuller longer. Fiber also helps control blood sugar and lowers cholesterol levels.

Bump up Your Fiber

Here are six tips to help you bump up your fiber:

  • Slice up raw veggies and keep them in to-go baggies to use as quick snacks;

  • Start your day off with a high-fiber breakfast like whole grain oatmeal sprinkled with pecans or macadamia nuts;

  • Steam veggies rather than boiling them. When buying frozen veggies, look for ones that have been “flash frozen”;

  • Add half a cup of beans or peas to your salad to add fiber, texture, and flavor; and
  • Eat lots of salads

    Eat lots of salads

  • Take fiber supplements that contain fiber-rich ingredients such as psyllium, oat fiber and rice bran, just to name a few.

Yes, eating a fiber-wise diet will help us have healthy lifestyles.

Some of this information came from the Center for Disease Control.

https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/nutrition/pdf/rtp_practitioner_10_07.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psyllium

https://www.cdc.gov/features/national-nutrition-month/index.html

The pictures of the peas, cherries and Chinese cabbage are from

https://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/nutrition/pdf/rtp_practitioner_10_07.pdf